Triple P parenting seminars in Western Australia earn top marks

Feedback from both practitioners and parents at a recent West Australian Triple P parenting and professional development seminar has been overwhelmingly positive, organisers say.

The professional development forum, organised by the WA Department
of Health, Department of Education and Department of Local Government and Communities Department, was also attended by the acting Commissioner for Children and Young People in Western Australia, Jenni Perkins, along with more than 130 representatives from government and non-government agencies.

More than three-quarters of responding providers who attended the March forum said they would attend similar events in future.

Acting Commissioner Jenni Perkins’ report on the forum can be found here.

A summary report on the two-day event also showed that satisfaction levels were high among the vast majority of parents who attended the Triple P Seminar, Raising Resilient Children, featuring Triple P founder and director of the Parenting and Family Support Centre, Professor Matt Sanders.

Parents from the seminar overwhelmingly reported the information presented was meaningful and useful, met their expectations and they came away knowing enough to implement the advice received.

Highlights for parents included the fact that they felt reassured they were doing the right thing, that the strategies they were learning might have an impact on later life outcomes as well as the fact that they now felt able to teach their children emotional and social coping skills as well as how to manage strong emotions.

 

Innovation scholarships announced for Triple P

A new research initiative at The University of Queensland, the Triple P Innovation Precinct, has announced four scholarship positions.

The TPIP is an activity of the Parenting and Family Support Centre, led by Professor Matt Sanders, the founder of the Triple P – Positive Parenting Program.

The TPIP will explore how Triple P can be applied to address some unique and interesting challenges.child-beach

Projects will explore how innovation in a system of child and family interventions (Triple P) can be applied to such things as improving the way people interact with the natural environment and the value of parenting programs in developing countries. Read more

Do boys suffer when mothers go back to work? Not necessarily

The rise of workforce participation by mothers is regarded as an international social phenomenon.

And while studies have suggested that girls with working mums are likely to enjoy a range of advantages, provocative new research suggests that boys over time might not do as well.

This was the subject of discussion on a recent Radio National Life Matters program hosted by Natasha Mitchell featuring Professor Matt Sanders, Professor of Clinical Psychology, director of the Parenting and Family Support Centre, and founder of the Triple P – Positive Parenting Program, Professor Marian Baird, Professor of Employment Relations and Director of the Women Work Research Group in the University of Sydney Business School, and Dr Xiaodong Fan, research fellow at the Centre of Excellence in Population Ageing Research in the University of New South Wales.

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Data bank could ensure early intervention research for years to come

AN eight-year study into the effectiveness of early intervention programs in an historically disadvantaged community in Ireland could have research implications that last a lot longer than the original study.

Dr Orla Doyle

Dr Orla Doyle

Funded by Atlantic Philanthropies and the Irish Government, the experimental evaluation of the Preparing for Life early childhood intervention in a community in Dublin, Ireland, is now reaching the end of its data collection period.

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Work on teens profiled

The work of the Parenting and Family Support Centre’s Dr Kylie Burke and Dr Cassandra Dittman has been profiled in Campus Review, a publication which connects readers across Australian research institutions.

In an article for Campus Review, as well as in an audio interview available on the Campus Review website, Dr Burke talks about how effective parenting and close parent-adolescent relationships are important protective factors for children in adolescence.

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Ireland and the population-level effect: How schools were the key to reaching those most in need

Brief interventions played a major role in the success of a population-level delivery of the Triple P system in the Irish Midlands, the director of the partnership involved in the rollout, Conor Owens, told this year’s Helping Families Change Conference (HFCC) in Amsterdam.

The Longford Westmeath Parenting Partnership made Triple P available free to all parents of children under the age of eight to reduce prevalence rates of clinically elevated social, emotional and behavioural problems in children, estimated to be one in five children in Ireland.

Their goal was also to help parents become more confident and feel more supported, as well as to reduce parents’ levels of anxiety and depression relating to their children’s behaviour.

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News about the research is spreading around the world but more families need to find out about Stepping Stones Triple P

At a time when educators, parents and policy advisors in Australia are grappling with how to deal with the emotional and behavioural needs of children with disabilities, Stepping Stones Triple P is demonstrating it can provide at least some of the answers.

The evidence is clear that rates of depression and anxiety are much higher for mothers of children with a developmental disability than those of typically developing children (Gray et al., 2011). We also know children with an intellectual disability are also more likely to be diagnosed with a psychiatric disorder, such as anxiety disorder, depression, and conduct disorder (Emerson, 2003; Gadow, Guttmann-Steinmetz, Rieffe, & DeVincent, 2012).

So when a paper is published confirming that evidence-based programs can help these families, I think we should all be shouting it from the rooftops, so that families and policy makers hear the message loud and clear.

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‘We need to turn wishful thinking to help the lives of children into a public funding priority to support the skills of parents’

In a world where the well-being of children is a priority, preparing for parenting would become something people aspire to, not something associated with stigma, Professor Matt Sanders, founder of the Triple P – Positive Parenting Program, told delegates at this year’s Helping Families Change Conference in The Netherlands.

In such a world, evidence-based parenting programs would become a policy priority for governments and be funded accordingly because parents had demanded that it be so.

“The single most important thing we as a community we can do to promote the well-being of children and reduce child maltreatment is to increase the skills, confidence and competence of parents at a whole-of-population level,’’ Professor Sanders said in his keynote address to the 17th annual HFCC at the historic Beurs Van Berlage building in the heart of Amsterdam.

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