‘Now, when there is a problem, I just breathe and I deal with the problem with no anger. This is good. For me, I think the program has changed my life.’

 

Evidence of cultural acceptability in research trials is one thing.

But a video produced by a local authority in the United Kingdom which is delivering Triple P Seminars, Triple P Discussion Groups and Group Triple to parents is a convincing argument for the way the program can help parents across all sections of the community.

Depicting a group of women participating in an Arabic-speaking Group Triple P session in Brighton and Hove, the video is also a great illustration of the cultural acceptability of the program.

Arabic-speaking and Triple P International-trained and accredited Triple P practitioner Kafa Atar, who leads the group in Brighton and Hove through her work with the local authority’s Ethnic Minority Achievement Service, has lived in five Middle Eastern countries, including Iraq for the most part, but also in Syria for two years.

She is passionate about helping families settle in the United Kingdom from these countries and says that timing is everything when it comes to offering parenting support, following a thorough assessment of needs and readiness.

Kafa says Triple P can help parents negotiate the sometimes tricky transition to school. But it also can help families negotiate their new life.

“For me, it’s for two purposes,” Kafa says in the video. “It’s to bridge the gap between two cultures. Our parenting style is very different . . . We are scared of English culture.”

In the video Kafa says that addressing bad behaviour is all about establishing routines. Establishing good routines can have an effect on a child’s learning as well as having an impact on their lives at school.

Kafa says the use of praise is not common in Middle Eastern parenting culture but through the group sessions, parents learn that it can be a powerful tool.

Parents participating in the video also provide a great illustration of how they are now dealing with life now.

“Now, when there is a problem, I just breathe and I deal with the problem with no anger,” says mother Areej Al-Jwait, from Iraq. “Now they (the children) become more honest and they come to me and they tell me the problem without any fear. And I will be quiet and I breathe and I deal with the problem. This is good. For me . . . I think the program has changed my life.”

EMAS team leader Sarah Berliner said EMAS also delivers Triple P programs in Polish, Chinese, Pashto and have just trained staff for Bengali and Oromiffa-speaking families.

“It is really powerful and meaningful work and makes such a difference to the outcomes for the pupils and their families,” Ms Berliner said.

The video was produced by independent UK producer Cathy Maxwell, who volunteered her services for EMAS.