Delivering a population rollout of the Triple P – Positive Parenting Program takes planning and commitment. But help is available. And the rewards are strong outcomes and sustained delivery

The team behind the successful rollout of the Triple P – Positive Parenting Program in the Irish Midlands has put its experiences into an implementation guide for other organisations wanting to improve the quality of life for children and parents at a population level.

The guide, Getting Started – Getting Better, sets out to help agencies considering implementing Triple P’s population health approach.

The Triple P multi-level system of parenting programs was delivered community-wide in the Irish Midlands by the Midlands Area Parenting Partnership (MAPP), which included representatives from the Irish Health Services Executive as well as community organisations. You can read about the evaluation of the project, funded by Atlantic Philanthropies, here.

That 2014 evaluation determined that a number of health outcomes for children and parents changed at the population level, including a 37.5 per cent drop in the numbers of children experiencing clinically elevated levels of social, emotional and behavioural problems.

When organisations such as MAPP and others around the world get it right, everyone wants to know the secret. With that in mind, the team behind MAPP have collected their experiences into a guide suitable for organisations with similar levels of capacity. It sets out to help organisations navigate what can often be the tricky process of embedding a system of evidence-based programs into a sustained delivery model that is implemented with fidelity.

Triple P founder and director of the Parenting and Family Support Centre at The University of Queensland, Professor Matt Sanders, described MAPP as a group which had valued the Triple P population approach from the start. MAPP had developed their own organisational structures to ensure the Triple P system was implemented with fidelity and quality assurance mechanisms were built in.

“MAPP understood from the outset the importance of building in local evaluations of evidence-based programs to ensure quality delivery. They learnt how to adapt to change and continue working on the sustained delivery of the program,’’ Professor Sanders said.

Best-practice example of organisational self-regulation

Professor Sanders described MAPP’s delivery of the Triple P system as a best-practice example of organisational self-regulation at work, to the extent that MAPP had designed their own system of implementation and evaluation to ensure the outcomes they were seeking for children and families were achieved.

“The principal of self-regulation and minimal sufficiency lies at the heart of the behaviour change model inherent in the Triple P – Positive Parenting Program and it’s always great to see this tenet at work with parents and children and practitioners. This is a great example of self-regulation and minimal sufficiency at work at an organisational level,’’ Professor Sanders said.

Around the same time as the MAPP rollout, The University of Queensland’s commercial partner in the worldwide delivery of Triple P, Triple P International (TPI), began to develop an Implementation Framework to create a way for TPI to support organisations in the delivery of Triple P, depending on the needs of the delivery organisation.

The story of how the TPI Implementation Framework was developed, the research and program delivery experience it was built on, and how it works to support organisations delivering Triple P has just been published in high-impact journal Prevention Science.

The Triple P Implementation Framework: The Role of Purveyors in the Implementation and Sustainability of Evidence-based Programs explains that while organisations are encouraged and supported to become independent problem solvers to overcome implementation obstacles (self-regulation), they are also supported from the outset by TPI Implementation Consultants. These consultants provide a level of support adjustable to the often differing levels of need of delivery organisations (minimal sufficiency).

Author of the Prevention Science article, Jenna McWilliam, described MAPP as a best-practice example of an organisation which had required a relatively minimal level of implementation support from TPI.

“The development of the Implementation Framework was prompted by feedback from organisations faced with challenges implementing Triple P, such as understanding the particular needs of implementing Triple P in the adoption phase and how to effectively sustain implementation,’’ Ms McWilliam said.

“It’s always extremely encouraging to see organisations understanding the model behind Triple P and applying it in various ways around the world,’’ Professor Sanders said. “They are taking the evidence and making it their own. We can only encourage and applaud such organisations while endeavouring to do everything we can to support others to implement the Triple P system.’’