Innovation scholarships announced for Triple P

A new research initiative at The University of Queensland, the Triple P Innovation Precinct, has announced four scholarship positions.

The TPIP is an activity of the Parenting and Family Support Centre, led by Professor Matt Sanders, the founder of the Triple P – Positive Parenting Program.

The TPIP will explore how Triple P can be applied to address some unique and interesting challenges.child-beach

Projects will explore how innovation in a system of child and family interventions (Triple P) can be applied to such things as improving the way people interact with the natural environment and the value of parenting programs in developing countries. Read more

Do boys suffer when mothers go back to work? Not necessarily

The rise of workforce participation by mothers is regarded as an international social phenomenon.

And while studies have suggested that girls with working mums are likely to enjoy a range of advantages, provocative new research suggests that boys over time might not do as well.

This was the subject of discussion on a recent Radio National Life Matters program hosted by Natasha Mitchell featuring Professor Matt Sanders, Professor of Clinical Psychology, director of the Parenting and Family Support Centre, and founder of the Triple P – Positive Parenting Program, Professor Marian Baird, Professor of Employment Relations and Director of the Women Work Research Group in the University of Sydney Business School, and Dr Xiaodong Fan, research fellow at the Centre of Excellence in Population Ageing Research in the University of New South Wales.

Read more

ireland

Data bank could ensure early intervention research for years to come

AN eight-year study into the effectiveness of early intervention programs in an historically disadvantaged community in Ireland could have research implications that last a lot longer than the original study.

Dr Orla Doyle

Dr Orla Doyle

Funded by Atlantic Philanthropies and the Irish Government, the experimental evaluation of the Preparing for Life early childhood intervention in a community in Dublin, Ireland, is now reaching the end of its data collection period.

Read more

Kylie-Burke-620x330

Work on teens profiled

The work of the Parenting and Family Support Centre’s Dr Kylie Burke and Dr Cassandra Dittman has been profiled in Campus Review, a publication which connects readers across Australian research institutions.

In an article for Campus Review, as well as in an audio interview available on the Campus Review website, Dr Burke talks about how effective parenting and close parent-adolescent relationships are important protective factors for children in adolescence.

Read more

News about the research is spreading around the world but more families need to find out about Stepping Stones Triple P

At a time when educators, parents and policy advisors in Australia are grappling with how to deal with the emotional and behavioural needs of children with disabilities, Stepping Stones Triple P is demonstrating it can provide at least some of the answers.

The evidence is clear that rates of depression and anxiety are much higher for mothers of children with a developmental disability than those of typically developing children (Gray et al., 2011). We also know children with an intellectual disability are also more likely to be diagnosed with a psychiatric disorder, such as anxiety disorder, depression, and conduct disorder (Emerson, 2003; Gadow, Guttmann-Steinmetz, Rieffe, & DeVincent, 2012).

So when a paper is published confirming that evidence-based programs can help these families, I think we should all be shouting it from the rooftops, so that families and policy makers hear the message loud and clear.

Read more

shutterstock diabetes _124857070

The quest for glycemic control in children with type 1 diabetes. Can a parenting intervention such as Triple P help?

Parenting interventions such as Triple P have been shown to reduce mental health problems in children. But can a parenting intervention moderate the impact of type 1 diabetes in children as well as improve their mental health and wellbeing?

Two separate studies into the effects of Triple P – one conducted by a team across Melbourne, the other by an international team from Manchester and the University of Queensland’s Parenting and Family Support Centre – suggest these research questions are definitely worth pursuing.

The Melbourne randomised controlled trial (RCT), published in Pediatric Diabetes last year, tested whether Triple P could reduce or prevent mental health problems and improve glycemic control in children with type 1 diabetes.

Meticulous glycemic control is regarded as crucial in preventing serious complications for people diagnosed with type 1 diabetes.

If not managed properly, type 1 diabetes can lead to serious short-term consequences, such as extremely low and high blood glucose levels, both of which can be fatal. Long-term complications include blindness and damage to kidneys, nerves and heart.

Unfortunately, day to day management of type 1 diabetes is complicated and onerous, especially for teens who would prefer someone “just invent a cure already’’ and parents struggling with behaviour problems in their kids.

Read more

Japanese researcher’s background as a nurse eventually leads her to publish on Triple P

Dr Rie Wakimizu

Dr Rie Wakimizu

Dr Rie Wakimizu is an Associate Professor from the University of Tsukuba in Japan.

She was part of an interdisciplinary group whose study on the effects of Group Triple P for families raising preschool or school-aged children with developmental disabilities adds to the growing Triple P evidence base in Japan.

In this translated version, Dr Wakimizu explains what prompted her interest in helping children with developmental disorders and their families.

During my two years nursing in a paediatric ward, I looked after a child with a developmental disorder who also suffered from malignant tumours.

The child’s mother was a single mother with severe depression. The patient’s sibling was neglected and then went on to develop problems such as refusing to go to school.

It was because of this case that I became really interested in interventions for children with developmental disorders and their families.

Read more

Triple P making headway in Japan

Prof Matt Sanders with Associate Professor Chiyomi Agami, from the Fukuoka Prefecture University. Dr Egami has been running Triple P Group and Stepping Stones Group Triple P courses as a practitioner in Japan.

Prof Matt Sanders with Associate Professor Chiyomi Egami, from the Fukuoka Prefecture University. Dr Egami has been running Triple P Group and Stepping Stones Group Triple P courses as a practitioner in Japan.

The use of the Triple – Positive Parenting Program to treat and prevent child maltreatment may be finding high-level support in Japan, an article in last week’s Yomiuri Shimbun suggests.

Triple P founder and director of the University of Queensland’s Parenting and Family Support Centre, Prof Matt Sanders, was in Japan last week to address the Japanese Society for the Prevention of Child Abuse and Neglect.

Prof Sanders met with the Governor of Wakayama Prefecture, Yoshinobu Nisaka, and raised the importance of governments taking a public health approach to treat and prevent problems of child maltreatment.

The meeting was covered by Yomiuri Shimbun, a newspaper regarded as having the largest readership in the world with a daily circulation of more than 13 million readers.

Governor Nisaka is quoted in Yomiuri Shimbun as saying that he would like to actively implement Triple P.

Read more